Overdraft Fee Transparency

Overdraft fee transparency

Learn how to get a clear explanation of an overdraft fee you've incurred.

Fees from your bank can be confusing. Ever had an overdraft fee and not sure how it happened? At BB&T, our goal is to make it as easy as possible for you to know exactly what you're paying for and why. BB&T gives you a clear and immediate explanation. If you're assessed an overdraft fee, you can review the details in Online Banking with U by BB&T from any device.

For example, from the web, simply log in to U, go to Accounts, and select the account that incurred the fee. Under transactions, select the overdraft item. Then tap "How did I incur this fee?" There you can view a detailed letter that fully explains how the charges occurred, including the items pending against your daily posted balance, and items that came in for payment and were posted to your account—either of which could have resulted in a negative balance. You'll also see the exact number and types of fees that were charged against your account along with your resulting daily posted balance.

But wouldn't you like to avoid overdraft fees altogether? We offer ways to help you with that as well. Overdraft protection is one of the best ways to avoid fees for overdrafts. You can add overdraft protection or enable overdraft review within Customer Service and U. You can also add alerts to help avoid fees. You can get texts or emails when your balance is low or negative.

If you need more information about fees, visit our At A Glance page on BBT.com. You can learn about fees specific to your accounts and get answers to your frequently asked questions. So let's be clear—we want to make sure you aren't confused or burdened by bank fees. That's fee transparency with BB&T.

The information provided is not intended to be legal, tax, or financial advice. BB&T hopes you find this information useful but we cannot guarantee that it is accurate, up to date, or appropriate for your situation. Financial calculators are provided to assist you in estimating the approximate costs associated with any bank activity. Your actual costs may vary. You should consult with a qualified attorney or financial advisor to understand how the law applies to your particular circumstances or for financial information specific to your personal or business situation.

Branch Banking and Trust Company, Member FDIC.